Thesis viva preparation

What are the most original or value-added parts of your thesis? Which propositions or findings would you say are distinctively your own?

Thesis viva preparation

Workbook Headings Expanded And Explained Examiners Find out who the external and internal examiners will be, look up their body and work and see which, if any is relevant to my thesis. Some of these are relevant o parts of my thesis, so I will summarise those, to help get the information into my head.

Read and summarise these, in case the examiners ask about them Introduction I already know that I am expected to make a 10 minute presentation on my thesis showing what it covered. I have been advised that it is CRUCIAL to make my conclusions crystal clear and to hammer these home; and to ensure that my unique contribution to knowledge is also made very clear.

Overall Thesis There are many things to consider and I am not going to include them all here because many may not be relevant to your viva, however, there is a list of links further on down that you may find useful in preparing for your own viva.

Thesis viva preparation

Know my key findings and contribution and what justifies this work as a doctorate as opposed to a lesser degree Mark key sections with tabs Prepare a 1 page summary of each chapter and a one sentence summary of each chapter!

Know what claims I am making Know my justification for making these claims For me, making a one page and one sentence summary for each chapter will be a very useful way of going through the thesis and looking at it in an overall fashion, as opposed to just reading and re-reading it.

A Viva is an Interview

I have already created an abstract of the work and this was included in the thesis I submitted. Knowing how I justify the thesis as being of doctoral level will be important in defending my thesis at the oral exam.

Jan 11,  · A viva is an oral examination, rather like an interview, in front of a panel of experts, who ask questions about your dissertation or thesis. The term “Viva” is short for the Latin phrase, “Viva Voce”, meaning, “live voice”.Reviews: Viva Preparation After years compiling and writing up your research, don’t let yourself down at the last hurdle. The viva is an oral examination undertaken on submission of your thesis, yet few universities offer PhD students the opportunity to practice for this. From my friend Stephanie: when I met her before my viva, she said something to the effect of, “Your thesis isn’t finished. It’s not final. You will make some changes before you submit the hardcopy, and you’ll change it a bunch again if you make it into a book.”.

I will need to remind myself of why I chose the particular method, consider any limitations and whether I would do anything differently if I were to run it again. Analysis This is a very important section and I will need to summarise the findings as they relate to the research questions I posed in preparing the literature survey.

I used human subjects, so may need to consider the ethical implications of this.

Thesis - Wikipedia

Review Again, a very important section. This looks at the overall thesis and so of course will be different for each person. The questions to develop here might consider the implications of my research, whether it could have been done better, whether I needs to be redone in a different way and what difference my findings may have made to my field.

Reflection I suppose the questions people are suggesting here really look at how I have changed over the course of doing the thesis and how my thinking has changed. I know that some very big changes have happened and I will need to think about those. Conclusion I have been advised to prepare a concluding statement, showing how my work has made a difference and emphasising the conclusions I came to, making sure to end on a positive note.

This would also be the point at which to pick up any points that had been missed.In preparation for this academically sound exegesis of the viva, I have conducted extensive research – well, I did a Google search and looked at the first two pages of hits (does anyone really do any more these days?) – and found no evidence of anyone dying during their viva so go for it!

Practice Viva Questions — University of Leicester

The PORT website on viva preparation. Including useful tips, for example on likely questions Including useful tips, for example on likely questions Hot topics.

Jan 11,  · A viva is an oral examination, rather like an interview, in front of a panel of experts, who ask questions about your dissertation or thesis.

Every viva examination is different, so it is not possible to know in advance exactly what the examiners will ask you. However, there are some common questions which you may like to practice as part of your own preparations. This guide addresses the period between the submission of your thesis and the day of your viva. It offers ideas to help you perform calmly and confidently in your oral examination. Introduction. So far you may have focussed primarily on writing your thesis: making sure it was in good shape before submitting it. The PORT website on viva preparation. Including useful tips, for example on likely questions Including useful tips, for example on likely questions Hot topics.

The term “Viva” is short for the Latin phrase, “Viva Voce”, meaning, “live voice”.Reviews: The PORT website on viva preparation. Including useful tips, for example on likely questions Including useful tips, for example on likely questions Hot topics.

Viva preparation In advance of the viva, think about and do the following: 1.

Introduction

Summarise - on paper and in your head - the thesis chapter by chapter: the key questions in each chapter, the key examples/illustrations used to investigate them, the key findings and conclusions. 2. Viva Preparation After years compiling and writing up your research, don’t let yourself down at the last hurdle.

The viva is an oral examination undertaken on submission of your thesis, yet few universities offer PhD students the opportunity to practice for this.

How to survive a PhD viva: 17 top tips | Education | The Guardian